Do! Judge A Book By Its Cover Issue 88: Literary Fiction (Part 8)

Do! Judge A Book By Its Cover is a regular feature on Pop! Goes The Reader in which I pay tribute to some of the best and brightest the publishing world has to offer in the way of book cover design. This feature is inspired by Katie’s feature Cover Love on her blog One Page At A Time. The idea is being used with her gracious permission.

Some of my favourite covers this week include The Dogs of Littlefield by Suzanne Berne, The Château by Paul Goldberg, The Way Back To Us by Kay Langdale, The Afterlives by Thomas Pierce, A Life of Adventure and Delight by Akhil Sharma, The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman, The Nothing by Hanif Kureishi, Still Lives by Maria Hummel, A Brave Man Seven Storeys Tall by Will Chancellor, The Friendly Ones by Philip Hensher, The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler and The Emissary by Yōko Tawada.

Please Note: I’ve done my best to credit the designers and artists responsible for the beautiful covers below, but was unable to find this information for a number of those listed. If you know of an uncredited designer responsible for any of these book covers, please let me know and I would be happy to include proper attribution in this post. Their work is lovely and deserves to be credited.

01. The Dogs of Littlefield by Suzanne Berne
02. The Château by Paul Goldberg (Designed by Steven Seighman, Art by David Curtis Studio)

03. The Way Back To Us by Kay Langdale
04. The Invaders by Karolina Waclawiak

05. The Afterlives by Thomas Pierce (Design by Gretchen Achilles)
06. Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday

07. A Life of Adventure and Delight by Akhil Sharma (Design by Alex Kirby)
08. The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman (Design by Jaya Miceli)

09. The Nothing by Hanif Kureishi (Design by Jamie Keenan)
10. Hollow by Owen Egerton (Design by Matt Dorfman)

11. Still Lives by Maria Hummel
12. The Word For Woman Is Wilderness by Abi Andrews

13. A Brave Man Seven Storeys Tall by Will Chancellor
14. The World Is A Narrow Bridge by Aaron Thier

15. The Friendly Ones by Philip Hensher
16. The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler (Design by Allison Saltzman)

17. The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler
18. The Emissary by Yōko Tawada

19. My Cat Yugoslavia by Pajtim Statovci (Design by Oliver Munday)
20. We All Love The Beautiful Girls by Joanne Proulx (Design by Jennifer Griffiths, Cover image by Ian Ross Pettigrew)

Now it’s your turn! What are some of your favourite Literary Fiction covers? Did I list one of your favourites here or is there one I forgot that just has to be included? Let me know in the comments!

New Kids On The Block 2018 with Emma Berquist

New Kids On The Block is a year-long series on Pop! Goes The Reader meant to welcome and celebrate new voices and debut authors in the literary community.

Are you a debut author whose book is being published in 2018? It’s not too late to sign-up! If you want to participate in New Kids On The Block this year, please don’t hesitate to get in touch! You can send a tweet or DM on Twitter to @Pop_Reader or email me at Jen@PopGoesTheReader.com. I would love to collaborate with you!


About Emma Berquist

Emma Berquist grew up in Austin, Texas and sunburns easily. She currently lives in New Zealand and avoids the beach. Devils Unto Dust is her first novel.

Author Links: WebsiteTwitterInstagramGoodreads






Five Interesting Facts I Learned While Doing Book Research That I Shall Now Impart To You

1. The first person to ever survive rabies without the vaccine was a fifteen-year-old girl in Wisconsin who was bitten by a bat in 2004. Doctors put her into a drug-induced coma so they could regulate her breathing and swallowing while her immune system attacked the virus. The girl recovered and the treatment is now called the “Milwaukee protocol,” although of the 25 times it’s been used since, only 4 other people have survived. Bottom line: if you think you might have rabies, get the vaccine ASAP.

2. Variolation was the first method used to immunize people against smallpox. Doctors would take smallpox scabs, dry them and grind them into a powder, then introduce them to a patient’s skin through a small scratch. Yes, history is disgusting.

3. Ulysses S. Grant smoked around 20 cigars a day and got kicked out of the army for drinking too much because he was bored and depressed. (Historical figures! They’re just like us!) He also said one of the happiest days of his life was the day he left the presidency.

4. Thanks to Hollywood, when many people think “cowboy” they picture someone like John Wayne or Clint Eastwood. In reality, the old west was a lot more diverse than the movies make it out to be. By the late 19th century, roughly one in three cowboys was Mexican, as many as 20% were black, and about 20,000 Chinese immigrants were instrumental in constructing the railroads.

5. John Wayne’s real name is Marion Robert Morrison. I just think it’s important people know this.

Title Devils Unto Dust
Author Emma Berquist
Pages 496 Pages
Intended Target Audience Young Adult
Genre Western, Horror
Publication Date April 10th 2018 by Greenwillow
Find It On GoodreadsAmazon.comChaptersThe Book Depository

Keep together. Keep your eyes open. Keep your wits about you.

The desert is unkind in the best of times. And the decade since the Civil War has been anything but the best of times for Daisy Wilcox — call her Willie — and her family. This tense, heart-pounding alternate history about a young woman fighting to survive the unthinkable will keep fans of Westworld and The Walking Dead reading late into the night.

A horrifying sickness has spread across the West Texas desert. Infected people — shakes — attack the living, and the surviving towns are only as safe as their perimeter walls are strong. The state is all but quarantined from the rest of the country. Glory, Texas, is a near ghost town. Still, seventeen-year-old Willie has managed to keep her siblings safe, even after the sickness took their mother. But then her good-for-nothing father steals a fortune from one of the most merciless shake hunters in town, and Willie is left on the hook for his debt. With two young hunters as guides, Willie sets out across the desert to find her father. And the desert holds more dangers than just shakes.

Between The Lines with Amy Spalding and Jasmine Guillory

Between The Lines is a sporadic feature on Pop! Goes The Reader in which authors and other industry professionals provide further insight into the writing and publishing process in the form of interviews, guest posts, etc. So, sit back, relax, and enjoy as we read between the lines.


About Amy Spalding

Amy Spalding grew up in St. Louis, but now lives in the better weather of Los Angeles. She has a B.A. in Advertising & Marketing Communications from Webster University, and an M.A. in Media Studies from The New School. Amy studied longform improv at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.

By day, she manages the digital media team for an indie film advertising agency. By later day and night, Amy writes, performs, and pets as many cats as she can.

Author Links: WebsiteTwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreads


About Jasmine Guillory

Jasmine Guillory is a graduate of Wellesley College and Stanford Law School. She is a Bay Area native who has towering stacks of books in her living room, a cake recipe for every occasion, and upwards of 50 lipsticks. The Wedding Date is her first novel.

Author Links: WebsiteTwitterInstagramFacebookTinyLetterGoodreads



Jasmine Guillory Interviews Amy Spalding

Amy! I’m so excited that THE SUMMER OF JORDI PEREZ (AND THE BEST BURGER IN LOS ANGELES) is now out, because I love that book and I can’t wait for everyone to read it! This is your fifth book, and your fourth set in LA; what’s your favorite thing about LA as a setting for books, especially books about teenagers?

I love that Los Angeles is actually lots of little towns and areas comprising this giant metropolis, and neighborhoods are so specific and very much their own thing. Most of my L.A. books are actually set very close to one another, but they can feel completely different because of the specific flavor of individual neighborhoods. This is such a wonderful gift as a setting and backdrop, as I love including real restaurants, shops, etc., in my books. I also think that the rest of the country also has an idea of what they think Los Angeles is like (Hollywood, palm trees, convertibles, the beach, etc.) that is so different from my daily experience, and I love showing that L.A. has all these other sides too.

JORDI is a fun book about two queer teenage girls where none of the angst and conflict has anything to do with them being queer. How and why did you decide to write the book that way?

When I set out to write the book, I kept thinking about how many queer YA novels are tragic. Someone is bullied, someone is shunned, someone is thrown out of their home, someone dies. Look, I’m all for darkly realistic stories that show important truths, but back when I was starting to put together the ideas for this book, I wasn’t seeing many lighter books as a balance. Even books with happier endings often required something really hard to overcome to get there, and it nearly always involved coming out/acceptance/etc. Again, I’m not saying these books aren’t important and don’t tell of important and real things many queer teens go through. But I kept thinking if I were a queer teen right now, I’d also want books to show me the best of what I might go through. I’d want fun and fluffy books! I’d want swoony girls with great hair to fall for!

I also think a lot of queer YA is centered around the coming out experience, which isn’t necessarily everyone’s actual narrative. Coming out is often so much more complicated, messier, ongoing than it’s portrayed. It can also inadvertently recenter the experience around straight people reacting to the queer person, instead of keeping the focus on them.

What it boils down to, I think, is that previously, straight audiences were considered first and foremost for queer stories in YA, and what’s exciting now is that seems cast aside. Does this mean straight readers can’t get lots out of these stories? No! In fact, the variety of stories out there means more things everyone might like! I’m thrilled at how much the landscape seems to have shifted from when I initially began thinking about this book until now as it’s being released.

I love to read romance (obviously, since I write romances about grownups!). All of your books so far have been teen rom-coms; what is it about this kind of story – especially for and about teens – that appeals to you?

I love the magic of the world of rom-coms. In real life, if you dropped your grocery bag, you would probably just smash some eggs and be sad. In rom-coms, a Bartlett pear might wobble away from you and into the beautifully delicate hands of an attractive person with great hair and now they are gonna marry you!! I can’t get enough of this magic.

There’s also a safety in rom-coms — as a reader (or viewer of movies and TV!), you can get through the sad parts, the dark night of the soul, because you know where rom-coms are leading. And so it’s a fun way to test your emotions because inherently the safety net is there.

Rom-coms also have a basic structure all set up for you, as a writer, so it’s so much fun to get in there and see how you can mess with it. How can you sneak in your meet cute or make the reader wait longer for that first kiss than they’re expecting? I love thinking of tropes but then also thinking of ways to bust them.

One of my favorite things about your books is that the family relationships are so complex and ring so true to me, and JORDI is a great example of this, with both Abby and Jordi’s families. Why do family relationships like this interest you so much, and is there anything you’ve done to learn how to write them so well?

I have to say that when my first books came out and people kept talking about how glad they were that I dealt so much with family, I was surprised, because honestly I never thought about not including family. Family is such a huge part of many people’s lives, particularly as young people when you typically still live with at least one parent and, potentially, siblings. So if I’m writing about a teen’s life, they’re just going to be included, even if they aren’t a huge part of the actual plot.

I also think that family can be a great way to inform or to shade in why a character might feel a certain way, make certain choices, expect certain things. And, often, your teenage years are when you really start to comprehend just how different families can be, and also a time when you may be seeing your parents as actual humans for the first time. So it’s always a fun complication to have on hand, even when there’s little drama there or no dramatic shifts.

Recently you tweeted that if you had to change anything in JORDI, you would have Abby talk more about how stressful it is to keep her hair pink. As someone who has always wanted pink hair but has been put off by the maintenance, please tell me everything about what it’s like to have pink hair, the good and the bad.

Look, I love my hair right now. But it is so much work! First, you have to bleach it, then tone it, then dye it pink. This doesn’t sound too bad, really, that’s just a few steps. But the pink dye does not stay. If you wash your hair with standard shampoo, you could wash, like, half the vibrancy out in one go. So I had to switch to a non-sulfates shampoo, which I can’t say is more expensive than my last one, because I was already a shampoo snob, but it doesn’t smell as delightful and doesn’t lather up satisfyingly. I also use oVertone conditioner to infuse pink back into it, along with a weekly treatment from oVertone that is basically like dyeing it more. Even in doing all of this, my hair slowly fades constantly, which means I can’t just redye it when my roots show, I have to redye it often. And that’s WITH the pink conditioner AND with skipping as many shampoos as I can. (AND I HATE SKIPPING SHAMPOOING! I LOVE SHAMPOOING MY HAIR! And YES I know about co-washing and I do it OFTEN but it’s not nearly as satisfying to me.)

But here’s the thing – I love how it looks and I get tons of compliments. I’m not someone who’s afraid of her age (usually) but I will say for a very old woman I have been carded a lot more since I dyed my hair pink. Also I’ve just, like, always wanted to have it, and it’s exciting that now I do.

Fashion plays a big role in JORDI. Have you always been into fashion, like Abby, or did this become a love of yours more recently?

It’s been more recent. For a long time, being fat meant you could shop at, like, Lane Bryant or The Avenue, or Catherine’s Plus Sizes or whatever it’s called, or the plus size sections in department stores that they hid away from the other women’s clothing in the lower level or upper reaches of the store lurking behind the coordinating Calphalon pots and pans. So, like, I tried, but I never felt cute. And then Torrid opened in my town, and it really changed things up for me. Things were still pretty limited, though, so I’d say my full fashion love started in earnest a few years back once Modcloth and similar stores began carrying plus sizes, so I could fully shop for the toddler grandma (™ Cynara Geissler) style my heart desired. Basically, once I could get the clothes I actually wanted and felt good in, everything changed for me for the better.

You’ve been a published YA writer for over five years now, and I know you’ve been writing YA for longer than that. What big changes, good and bad, have you seen in YA publishing in the past five years?

I feel like publishers are finally seeing that readers want diversity in storytelling, in characters, in authors, in genres, and the New York Times list keeps proving that. I love seeing the huge variety of stories out there, not just right now, but the incredible-sounding books getting picked up for future publication. I hope that YA continues to fight for inclusion and boosting marginalized voices, and that racism within the industry is as addressed as sexism is.

What are some of the YA books that have come out recently, and that are about to come out, that you’re the most excited about?

I am so excited for Justina Ireland’s Dread Nation! I just heard on a podcast that it’s not horror, so I’m even more thrilled because, look, zombies terrify me. I am quite scared of everything! I was fortunate enough to be an early reader of Maurene Goo’s The Way You Make Me Feel and I can report that it’s as sweet and funny and warm as her first two books, plus set on my side of Los Angeles. I loved Ship It by Britta Lundin, which is funny and wise and takes on fandom from so many sides — plus, like, swoony love interest with an undercut. I’m in the midst of Adrienne Kisner’s Dear Rachel Maddow and am enjoying it so, so, much, and not just because Rachel Maddow’s name is in the title (though, like, not not because of that either, let’s be real).

And, finally, it’s not YA, but Jen Wang’s The Prince & the Dressmaker is the most beautiful book I’ve read in ages and I want to push it into the hands of all of you. ALL OF YOU! Imagine me pushing this beautiful fairy tale into your li’l outstretched hands.

Let’s talk about BURGERS. Abby and her friend Jax go on a search for the best burger in LA in this book. Did you go on any such burger hunts while writing, and also, what are your favorite toppings for burgers?

Oh, I ate so many burgers to write this book. It was a joy. Any of my friends who knew I was working on this book were so eager to explore different burger restaurants with me, making it the most fun I’ve ever had researching.

As for toppings, this is a great question. I am always in favor of just about any cheese, and I love condiments. Like, a really good aioli will make my whole day. Also really into fried eggs on burgers, especially when the yolk is still a little runny. I think most burgers can benefit from onions of some kind — caramelized onions, grilled onions, fried onion strings. ONIONS! I also occasionally really love a ridiculous burger. Recently I ate one that had buns made from two grilled cheese sandwiches. I also love the burger from Shake Shack that includes a deep-fried portabello mushroom filled with cheese. Who thought to do that? That person is a wild genius.

Now I’m very hungry. Thanks for all of the book recommendations and for all of the burgers I’m going to east ASAP, Amy!

Title The Summer of Jordi Perez (And The Best Burger In Los Angeles)
Author Amy Spalding
Pages 284 Pages
Intended Target Audience Young Adult
Genre & Keywords Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, F/F Romance
Publication Date April 3rd 2018 by Sky Pony Press
Find It On GoodreadsAmazon.comChaptersThe Book Depository

Seventeen, fashion-obsessed, and gay, Abby Ives has always been content playing the sidekick in other people’s lives. While her friends and sister have plunged headfirst into the world of dating and romances, Abby’s been happy to focus on her plus-size style blog and her dreams of taking the fashion industry by storm. When she lands a great internship at her favorite boutique, she’s thrilled to take the first step toward her dream career. Then she falls for her fellow intern, Jordi Perez. Hard. And now she’s competing against the girl she’s kissing to win the coveted paid job at the end of the internship.

But really, nothing this summer is going as planned. She also unwittingly becomes friends with Jax, a lacrosseplaying bro-type who wants her help finding the best burger in Los Angeles, and she’s struggling to prove to her mother ― the city’s celebrity health nut ― that she’s perfectly content with who she is.

Just as Abby starts to feel like she’s no longer the sidekick in her own life, Jordi’s photography surprisingly puts her in the spotlight. Instead of feeling like she’s landed a starring role, Abby feels betrayed. Can Abby find a way to reconcile her positive yet private sense of self with the image others have of her?

New Kids On The Block 2018 with Lindsay Champion

New Kids On The Block is a year-long series on Pop! Goes The Reader meant to welcome and celebrate new voices and debut authors in the literary community.

Are you a debut author whose book is being published in 2018? It’s not too late to sign-up! If you want to participate in New Kids On The Block this year, please don’t hesitate to get in touch! You can send a tweet or DM on Twitter to @Pop_Reader or email me at Jen@PopGoesTheReader.com. I would love to collaborate with you!


About Lindsay Champion

Lindsay Champion is a YA author living in the best place on earth, New York City. She is a graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, where she spent most of her time doing high kicks and eating falafel. She served as the Features Editor at Broadway.com, where she somehow managed to interview her celebrity crushes Paul Rudd, Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal without fainting or peeing her pants. She is currently an editorial director for the digital media company PureWow, where she sits in an extremely tall building and eats snacks. Someday, Somewhere is her first novel.

Author Links: WebsiteTwitterInstagramYouTubeGoodreads

I live in New York City, which is less of a place, and more a sparkling orb of energy — it’s a glorious jumble of lights and sounds and smells and people. It’s home to some of the best music, art and theater in the universe, and it’s impossible to walk down the block without feeling inspired. New York City is a major character in my new YA novel, Someday, Somewhere. As Dominique explores the city with Ben, she discovers a new world of music and art she never knew existed. Here are five amazing NYC spots they visit together (and you can check them out, too).

1. Carnegie Hall
I had the coolest opportunity to perform at this legendary concert hall with my high school choir, so I used my memories (and stage fright) of that experience when I was writing the book. I love this building, because it’s like a geode: completely unremarkable from the outside, but when you crack it open, it shines like nothing you’ve ever seen. And unlike a lot of these dusty old theaters in New York, which are, of course, beautiful in their own right, Carnegie Hall is actually really sleek and modern looking on the inside — it’s bright and vibrant and energizing, and the cheap seats all the way up in the balcony really are the best seats in the house for sound.


© Jeff Goldberg/Esto (Source)

2. Lincoln Center
One of my earliest memories of being in New York City is going to see Carousel at Lincoln Center with my parents. In the center of the complex there’s this beautiful stone fountain, and I remember not wanting to leave after the show was over. I wanted to camp out next to that fountain for the rest of the night, just watching people walk in and out of the gorgeous cream-colored buildings all around it. Now, whenever I go to Lincoln Center, I still feel instantly calm when I see that fountain. It’s my happy place.


(Source)

3. Village Vanguard
When I got into NYU and finally moved here, I got to do a lot of the non-touristy stuff for the first time. I went to see jazz at the Village Vanguard (or as cool people call it, just “the Vanguard”) with some friends, and I remember thinking that I became an official New Yorker that night. Just to be steeped in that history (it opened in 1935) and energy and talent. I was officially part of the fabric of the city, simply by sitting and listening to these geniuses play jazz.


(Source)

4. Ben’s Apartment
OK, Ben’s apartment is totally made up, and you definitely can’t visit it. But the Upper East Side is one of my favorite neighborhoods to walk in, because there are so many fancy apartment buildings with green awnings and doormen. I’ve never been able to afford to live in one of those buildings, but I love peeking into the lobbies as I pass, and imagine what it might be like. Sometimes, when I walk, I see the doorman open the door for a kid that looks just like Ben, probably coming home from his violin lesson.


© Jamie Grafton (Source)

5. Gramercy Park
Central Park is awesome and everything, but the city’s most mysterious, elusive park is definitely Gramercy. It’s impeccably manicured and almost always empty — that’s because it’s locked behind gates and you need your own key to get in. There have only been 383 keys made (and of course, Julia Roberts has one, because why wouldn’t she?). On sunny days, I walk the perimeter of the park, hoping I’ll be invited in. So far, it hasn’t happened, but a girl can dream…


© Jeffrey Zeldman (Source)


Created by Lindsay Champion

Title Someday, Somewhere
Author Lindsay Champion
Pages 280 Pages
Intended Target Audience Young Adult
Genre Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, Romance
Publication Date April 3rd 2018 by KCP Loft
Find It On GoodreadsAmazon.comChaptersThe Book Depository

Dominique is a high school junior from a gritty neighborhood in Trenton, where she and her mom are barely getting by.

Ben is a musical prodigy from the Upper East Side, a violinist at a top conservatory with obsessive talent and a brilliant future.

When Dom’s class is taken to hear a concert at Carnegie Hall, she expects to be bored out of her mind. But then she sees the boy in the front row playing violin like his life depends on it — and she is transfixed.

Posing as an NYU student, Dom sneaks back to New York City to track down Ben Tristan, a magnetic genius who whisks her into a fantasy world of jazz clubs and opera, infatuation and possibility. Each sees something in the other that promises to complete them.

But as Dom’s web of lies grows, so does Ben’s need to conquer Beethoven’s famous Kreutzer Sonata. Ben’s genius, which captivates Dominique, conceals a secret, and the challenges of Dom’s life may make it difficult for her to help him.

Alternating perspectives and an unreliable narrator create suspense and momentum, romance and heartbreak. Author Lindsay Champion’s deep roots in theater and music are evident on every page – structured like a sonata with hints of West Side Story, her debut novel hits all the right notes.

Do! Judge A Book By Its Cover Issue 87: Non-Fiction (Part 9)

Do! Judge A Book By Its Cover is a regular feature on Pop! Goes The Reader in which I pay tribute to some of the best and brightest the publishing world has to offer in the way of book cover design. This feature is inspired by Katie’s feature Cover Love on her blog One Page At A Time. The idea is being used with her gracious permission.

Some of my favourite covers this week include Bolshoi Confidential: Secrets of The Russian Ballet From The Rule of The Tsars To Today by Simon Morrison, What Would Dolly Do?: How To Be A Diamond In A Rhinestone World by Lauren Marino, The Secret Lives of Color by Kassia St. Clair, Hands: What We Do With Them and Why by Darian Leader, Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood, Ma’am Darling: 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret by Craig Brown and Life In The Garden by Penelope Lively.

Please Note: I’ve done my best to credit the designers, artists and illustrators responsible for the beautiful covers below whenever possible. If you know of an uncredited contributor responsible for any of these designs, please let me know and I would be happy to include proper attribution in this post. Their work is lovely and deserves to be credited.

01. Rock ‘n’ Radio: When DJs and Rock Music Ruled The Airwaves by Ian Howarth (Design by David Drummond)
02. Bolshoi Confidential: Secrets of The Russian Ballet From The Rule of The Tsars To Today by Simon Morrison (Design by Jo Walker)

03. Running Up That Hill by Vassos Alexander
04. My Life With Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul

05. What Would Dolly Do?: How To Be A Diamond In A Rhinestone World by Lauren Marino
06. The Secret Lives of Color by Kassia St. Clair

07. Things Are What You Make Of Them: Life Advice For Creatives by Adam J. Kurtz
08. Hands: What We Do With Them and Why by Darian Leader

09. Sweet Spot: An Ice Cream Binge Across America by Amy Ettinger (Design by Cassandra Garruzzo)
10. A Secret Sisterhood: The Literary Friendships of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf by Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney (Design by Jackie Shepherd)

11. Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood (Design by Rachel Willey)
12. Alone: Lost Overboard In The Indian Ocean by Brett Archibald (Design by Hewer Text)

13. Cigars by Nicholas Foulkes
14. Ma’am Darling: 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret by Craig Brown

15. The Wood: The Life and Times of Cockshutt Wood by John Lewis-Stempel
16. Life In The Garden by Penelope Lively

17. Dying by Cory Taylor
18. Orchid Summer: In Search of the Wildest Flowers of the British Isles by Jon Dunn

Now it’s your turn! What are some of your favourite Non-Fiction covers? Did I list one of your favourites here or is there one I forgot that just has to be included? Let me know in the comments!